FO: Budleigh

Second in my Rachel Coopey A-Z of socks is Budleigh.

I love the mix here of the double cables with the snaking twisted stitches.  The double cables are offset, giving a lovely slanted effect.  And in one of the designer’s signature features, the socks are perfect mirrors of each other. They were very quick to knit too, with the first one taking just a week from start to finish.

The yarn is a skein I’ve had in stash for a while. It’s Artists Palette Smoothie Sock in a bright semi-solid pink. The yarn is a blend of 75% merino and 25% nylon. It’s incredibly soft and quite fine.  I’ve been worried that the high merino content might make them prone to wear and felting, but they’ve been holding up very well so far, and the cheerful colour is just the thing on a dull day.

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FO: Alonzo

I’ve been enjoying my A-Z of shawls so much, I’ve decided to start one for socks as well.  But just to make things a little more challenging, I’m going to try to stick to patterns by one designer: Rachel Coopey.  Her sock patterns are beautifully written, a joy to knit and always very clever designs.  Looking at Ravelry, I’m good right up to until I get to Q, with a choice of patterns to make.  At the rate I knit socks, who knows – maybe she will have designed a pattern beginning with Q by the time I get there.

First up, is Alonzo, a beautifully textured pattern with Bavarian twisted stitches.  It’s just complex enough to keep you interested while you’re knitting, but without being so complex tht you can’t concentrate on anything else.  This is exactly the kind of knitting you can take out and about, or do while watching the television.

I love how the faux cables and twisted stitches build up the pattern, and how it grows and evolves.

It’s just such a shame that the dark winter days make it so difficult to properly photograph the colour of this yarn as well as I’d like.  It’s a rich, mallard green, called Apollo, with a beautiful intensity of colour.  It’s from a dyer called A Little Bit Sheepish, and is one of those skeins where the colour just called me from across the aisle at a yarn festival.  It’s a mix of 75% Bluefaced Leicester and 25% nylon.  The stitch definition is amazing, it takes dye beautifully, it has a generous 425 metres per 100g and it should make some hard-wearing socks.

FO: Phyllis Socks

One of the first skeins of yarn I bought from Third Vault Yarns, at Nine Worlds in 2015, was in a colourway called Gallifreyan Sunset.  It’s a measure of how fabulous Lola’s dyeing is that she has me falling in love with colours and dyeing styles that I would normally never contemplate.  Orange is just one of those colours that doesn’t agree with, much as I love its perky cheerfulness.

img_2945But I fell in love with this subtle blend of orange and terracotta, with its flashes of bright yellow and the occasional dusty purple.  And not just for being based on Doctor Who.  Lola tells me that this is such a difficult colourway she can’t reproduce it.   I have one of the few skeins that will ever exist.

img_2947I’d been saving it for the right project, and these socks were the perfect project.  The pattern is Phyllis, by Rachel Coopey, one of the patterns from her collection Coop Knits Socks Volume 2.  I love the textured cabled diamonds, and the definition provided by the twisted stitches.   The long chart meant this wasn’t the quickest of knits.  And it wasn’t helped by a catastrophic case of yarn barf that meant I had to untangle and completely recake the yarn at least twice, once during the middle of one of the panels at this year’s Nine Worlds.

img_2946Hand-knitted socks are perfect for these cold, wintery days.  And it brings me a great deal of knitterly and geeky pleasure to know that under my sober work outfits with their sensible winter boots I’m flying the geek flag with bright and cheerful socks.

FO: Narcissa socks

It’s been a while since I’ve posted an FO.  So let’s put that right.  Here are my Narcissa Socks.


The pattern is from Knitting Wizardry, which is the UK title of a book of patterns inspired by Harry Potter.  The book was a birthday present from a friend of mine.  When I saw these socks, and that the pattern was by Rachel Coopey – one of my favourite sock knitting designers – I knew they were the first thing I wanted to make from the book.


The complicated lace pattern – and the rash of baby knitting I’ve had to do recently – means these socks took longer to make than I was hoping.  I cast them on in May last year, and finished them early in April.  (That’s nearly a whole year for a pair of socks!)

Plus they’re right and left-footed, with a column of twisted stitches running down the outside of each foot.


The yarn is a beautiful variegated skein of Posh Elinor, in a colourway called Time, Gentlemen Please.  I love the mix of bold blues, with touches of purples and browns in there too.  I’ve had it in my stash for a while, waiting for the perfect project.

Now I just need to work out what to make from the book next.

FO: Jane Bennet socks

Yesterday I finished my Jane Bennet socks. 

 
The pattern is by Rachel Coopey and comes from volume 2 of Jane Austen Knits.  Despite looking pretty complex, they were surprisingly quick and easy to make. The pattern was very easy to memorise and simple to follow. 

 
I love the long leg length on these socks, though between that and the picot edging to the cuff they used up most of my skein of yarn. And I think the Parma Violet-ish colour of the yarn shows off the design really well. 

But do please excuse my pasty-white legs in the photos.  

The Joy of Socks

i love making socks. I always try to have a pair on the go. For me, they are the perfect portable knitting project. 

A sock project fits neatly into a small pouch you can carry round with you. I have many specially designed sock pouches (and I find them all but irresistible, particularly in bright and geeky fabrics) but the one I use most at the moment is a make up bag I got free as part of a Clinique Bonus Time offer. 

That portability is a great advantage. Socks have become the thing I reach for if I’m leaving the house and want to take some knitting with me. Lace is similarly compact, offering a lot of knitting bang for its weight, but its complexity and the long rows are much less practical for knitting in the pub, on the train or in dim light. Socks are things you can pick up and put down in short bursts and yarn robust enough to survive the wear and tear of shoes can survive being taken out and about. 

I knit during my book club. It helps me to concentrate by keeping my fidgety fingers occupied. The non-knitters in our group think this kind of multi-tasking is some kind of witchcraft. It’s not, honestly, it’s just the result of long practice. My fingers can move on automatic pilot. I once knitted most of the body of a sweater on autopilot. In black 4ply yarn. In the car. In the dark. But it was stocking stitch, and with stitch markers in place I just kept pootling along, knitting entirely by feel.  

The pick-up-and-put-down approach means progress can sometimes be a bit slow. The second sock of my Shur’tugal socks took most of the year they were on the needles, simply because opportunities to pick them up proved to be few. 

So, when I knew I was going to be going to EasterCon last weekend it was going to be a perfect opportunity to make progress on my Jane Bennet socks. 

During the opening ceremony on Friday they looked like this: 

  

And by Monday night they looked like this:

  

That’s a lot of progress over just one weekend, and I was only really knitting in the back of panels (I read while I was travelling). I was not the only one crafting while I was there. I saw a lot of knitting and crochet going on, and even a couple of people cross-stitching, though that’s much less portable. 

Appropriately enough, the yarn I’m using is a skein I bought at WorldCon in London last year. It’s from Germany, and has been hand-dyed using natural plant dyes. The pattern is one of Rachel Coopey‘s, from the second volume of Jane Austen Knits. It’s very quick to knit, and easy to memorise. I’m expecting to fly through Sock 2 over the next few weeks. 

The dilemma then will be which pattern to pick next … 

WIPs. Whipped.

This weekend I finished two Works In Progress (WIPs).

Firstly, my Chickadee – a cardigan with a colourwork yoke featuring little birds.  I started this last October – just before going on holiday and getting caught up in NaKniSweMo.  I’m really pleased with how the colours work together.  I’d quite like to make another, but substituting my own yoke design.

Little Birds
Chickadee

Secondly, I finished my Hedera socks.  I started these last year.  I cast the first one on during 9 Worlds, and had pretty much finished it by the end of WorldCon the following weekend.  But it’s taken since then to finish the second one.  I’ve only picked these up when I’ve been out and about (pub and book club, mostly), which has led to the slow progress.

Geek socks
Hedera Socks

I love the colour of these.  It reminds me of blackcurrant lime sweets.  The lace pattern is very easy to memorise, so they were the perfect portable project.

Of course, all this finishing means I have a bad case of Startitis …