Missy Cosplay: Part the Second (Pattern Cutting)

Today I spent cutting the pieces for the jacket for Missy.  I managed to watch the whole of Iron Man 3 and an episode of Orphan Black just while cutting out the paper pattern pieces and making some modifications.  This is going to be a long project to make …

As I said in the first part of this series of posts, I’m substituting in the collar and sleeves from another pattern for a coat of the same period.  The sleeves *should* be a straight-forward bait-and-switch.  Famous last words, no doubt.  But we’ll come to those in a later post.

So, in order to steal the collar from the second coat I traced the top of the fronts onto some baking parchment (no expense spared …) twice.  Once each for the front, and the front facing. I then taped these bits of baking parchment onto the pattern pieces, and modified the lines as need be with some more scraps of parchment.  I used the pattern notches on the front and the facing to make sure that I’d lined up each piece of the baking parchment so that they matched.   I’ve used Magic Tape so I can take the modifications off later and use the pattern again as it was originally intended.

IMG_1734
Behold my works ye mighty, and despair

This makes both the front and the front facing quite a bit bigger, and the facing will now need to be cut from the pattern fabric, rather than lining fabric, as it’s a foldback collar that exposes the inside of the coat.  Good job I bought plenty of fabric.

To make sure that I’ve got enough room to play with, I’ve cut the pattern a size larger than I would normally use.  That gives me scope to trim out any excess, and adjust seams as necessary to get a good fit.

The fabric I’m using is a crepe-style fabric I bought on Goldhawk Road.  I have no idea what it’s made of, but it feels like a polyester.  I have a lot of it, not least as it only cost £4 per metre.

IMG_1733

It’s quite lightweight, and would probably benefit from being lined.  But since I’m going to be wearing Missy in the summer I’ll try to get away without lining it.  But I will include the pockets.  Because pockets are useful.

The only piece of the jacket I haven’t yet cut is the collar.  It will probably need adjusting to allow for the different line of the fronts and backs of the jacket.  I’ll make a toile of that once I have the bodice together.  That will let me have a bit of a play so that I can get the fit and shape right.

Tomorrow, I’ll get the machine out, neaten the raw edges and start the construction.

 

Missy Cosplay: Part the First (The Plan)

My plan for this year is to cosplay Missy.  It’s another great choice I think.  It’s highly topical and she should be very recognisable.  It’s also a great character (I love that one of Who’s most iconic villains has become a woman) and the costume is very wearable.

Doctor-Who

I’m planning to write a series of blog posts about the process of making this costume, in particular documenting any pattern modifications I need to make to pull it together.  And, of course, I’ll show you the final result at the end.

In this first post in the series, I’d like to set out the plan of how I’m going to pull this look together.

For the jacket I’m going to use a combination of these two patterns.

IMG_1730

The one on the left has the right structure for the coat.  Option B has the right length.  It has the princess seams and the way the pockets are set in is perfect.  But the collar and cuffs are totally wrong.  So I plan to use the sleeves and collar from the pattern on the right, and to curve the hems on the front of the coat.  Merging pieces from these two patterns in this way is going to be an interesting challenge, so I think I’ll be making toiles of both collar and sleeves to see how they fit into the body of the coat, to enable me to make any modifications that will be needed.

Missy’s coat has a single back vent, which neither of these patterns has.  So I’m going to think carefully about whether I want to try and create a vent, or work without one.

The skirt is a very straight-forward panelled skirt.  I’ve pulled this pattern out of my stash.  Option D looks perfect, and I don’t propose any modifications to it at all.

IMG_1732

If I have time, I’d also like to make a blouse as well.  I have one in my wardrobe I can wear in a pinch, but it’s not quite right for the look, so I’d prefer to make one.

IMG_1810_zpsfcd0c571

Missy’s blouse is quite distinctive.  It has a bib front on it, with the blouse gathered underneath that, and a Peter Pan collar.  The body of the blouse has a fine blue stripe, but the collar is plain white.  There’s quite a bit of fullness in the sleeves.

I’ve really struggled to find a pattern for this.  Most of the bib front blouse patterns out there are the full Gibson Girl: back buttoning and with a traditional Edwardian high collar.  The closest I’ve been able to find is this one (which I bought at ruinous expense on eBay after a bidding war).

IMG_1731

I think Option C will give me the kind of look I’m after, but I’ll have to reshape the collar a bit again.  And the pin tucks will be interesting!

Missy also has some fabulous accessories.  I’ve found a black cameo brooch on eBay already (99p!) and it looks like I’ll have to learn some simple millinery skills.  Hat blanks can be bought fairly easily online, and I’ll need to attach some plastic fruit to one.