Austral – Paul McAuley

There’s a trend at the moment for ‘cli-fi’ – fiction dealing with climate change, its impact on the world and its consequences.  Paul McAuley is the latest to join the trend with Austral, (review copy from Gollancz).  

The titular Austral is a husky – genetically altered to thrive in the harsh environment of a settled and terraformed Antarctic that has been made habitable by climate change.  Huskies were created by the ecopoets – a radical sect of environmentalists committed to creating a new, biologically diverse Antactica.  But their vision for ecodiversity and sustainable slow change is not one that meshes with the need for immediate profit form the corporate entities exploiting Antarctica.  The genetic modifications that huskies have undergone are viewed with suspicion by unmodified humans, and they are treated as second class citizens, subject to travel restrictions and with limited rights.  Orphaned at a young age, Austral has grown up with bigotry and exploitation, struggling to find a place for herself in a world that will not let her fill the niche her parents envisaged.

The novel opens with Austral working as a prison guard, and the lover of a human organised criminal.  He continues to run his crime gang from within prison, relying on corrupt prison guards.  Through his abusive and exploitative relationship with Austral, he persuades her to take a key role in his plan to kidnap the daughter of a prominent politician, who is a distant cousin of Austral’s.  When the plan inevitably goes wrong, Austral finds herself on the run with her cousin across the frozen wastes of Antarctica.  As they are chased, Austral’s story is shown to us through a series of flashbacks.

I confess to being underwhelmed by Austral.  The main story is little more than an extended chase sequence.  While the novel has some interesting things to say about human modification, bigotry and the choices that face us about how we use and safeguard our natural environment, these issues were underexplored, with a fairly superficial treatment.  While entertaining and competently written, Austral is not a book that delivers much to excite or engage the reader.

Goodreads rating: 3*

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